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Commit 7f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420

User picture

Introduce ./configure based installation instructions

Replace custom INSTALL file with Automake provided generic version,
applicable for any package supplied with Autoconf ./configure script.

Move over the old Heyu version 1 README file to README1, then rename
the old INSTALL to README, which is mentioned in the generic INSTALL as
providing package specific installation instructions.

Drop README.INSTALL copy - INSTALL is now safe from being overwritten
by the make implicit rules with the contents of install.sh, already
renamed to post-install.sh.

Signed-off-by: Janusz Krzysztofik <jkrzyszt@tis.icnet.pl>

Files Affected

 
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
218
echo "The Makefile has been created for $SYS."
218
echo "The Makefile has been created for $SYS."
219
fi
219
fi
220
if [ "$SYS" = "opensolaris" ] ; then
220
if [ "$SYS" = "opensolaris" ] ; then
221
echo "Please see \"Notes for OpenSolaris\" in file INSTALL before proceeding."
221
echo "Please see \"Notes for OpenSolaris\" in file README before proceeding."
222
echo
222
echo
223
fi
223
fi
224
 
224
 
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
60
transmits at an RF frequency other than the 310 MHz used for X10
60
transmits at an RF frequency other than the 310 MHz used for X10
61
transceivers in North America.  A compile option is provided to
61
transceivers in North America.  A compile option is provided to
62
compile Heyu without CM17A support for users outside North America or those
62
compile Heyu without CM17A support for users outside North America or those
63
who simply have no interest in this device. (See the file "INSTALL" included
63
who simply have no interest in this device. (See the file "README" included
64
in the Heyu distribution directory.)
64
in the Heyu distribution directory.)
65
.PP
65
.PP
66
Heyu depends on a configuration file to tell it on what serial port
66
Heyu depends on a configuration file to tell it on what serial port
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
 
 
1
Installation Instructions
 
 
2
*************************
 
 
3
 
 
 
4
Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005,
 
 
5
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 
6
 
 
 
7
   Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification,
 
 
8
are permitted in any medium without royalty provided the copyright
 
 
9
notice and this notice are preserved.  This file is offered as-is,
 
 
10
without warranty of any kind.
 
 
11
 
 
 
12
Basic Installation
 
 
13
==================
 
 
14
 
 
 
15
   Briefly, the shell commands `./configure; make; make install' should
 
 
16
configure, build, and install this package.  The following
 
 
17
more-detailed instructions are generic; see the `README' file for
 
 
18
instructions specific to this package.  Some packages provide this
 
 
19
`INSTALL' file but do not implement all of the features documented
 
 
20
below.  The lack of an optional feature in a given package is not
 
 
21
necessarily a bug.  More recommendations for GNU packages can be found
 
 
22
in *note Makefile Conventions: (standards)Makefile Conventions.
 
 
23
 
 
 
24
   The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
 
 
25
various system-dependent variables used during compilation.  It uses
 
 
26
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
 
 
27
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
 
 
28
definitions.  Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
 
 
29
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
 
 
30
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
 
 
31
debugging `configure').
 
 
32
 
 
 
33
   It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
 
 
34
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
 
 
35
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring.  Caching is
 
 
36
disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
 
 
37
cache files.
 
 
38
 
 
 
39
   If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
 
 
40
to figure out how `configure' could check whether to do them, and mail
 
 
41
diffs or instructions to the address given in the `README' so they can
 
 
42
be considered for the next release.  If you are using the cache, and at
 
 
43
some point `config.cache' contains results you don't want to keep, you
 
 
44
may remove or edit it.
 
 
45
 
 
 
46
   The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
 
 
47
`configure' by a program called `autoconf'.  You need `configure.ac' if
 
 
48
you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using a newer version
 
 
49
of `autoconf'.
 
 
50
 
 
 
51
   The simplest way to compile this package is:
 
 
52
 
 
 
53
  1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
 
 
54
     `./configure' to configure the package for your system.
 
 
55
 
 
 
56
     Running `configure' might take a while.  While running, it prints
 
 
57
     some messages telling which features it is checking for.
 
 
58
 
 
 
59
  2. Type `make' to compile the package.
 
 
60
 
 
 
61
  3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
 
 
62
     the package, generally using the just-built uninstalled binaries.
 
 
63
 
 
 
64
  4. Type `make install' to install the programs and any data files and
 
 
65
     documentation.  When installing into a prefix owned by root, it is
 
 
66
     recommended that the package be configured and built as a regular
 
 
67
     user, and only the `make install' phase executed with root
 
 
68
     privileges.
 
 
69
 
 
 
70
  5. Optionally, type `make installcheck' to repeat any self-tests, but
 
 
71
     this time using the binaries in their final installed location.
 
 
72
     This target does not install anything.  Running this target as a
 
 
73
     regular user, particularly if the prior `make install' required
 
 
74
     root privileges, verifies that the installation completed
 
 
75
     correctly.
 
 
76
 
 
 
77
  6. You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
 
 
78
     source code directory by typing `make clean'.  To also remove the
 
 
79
     files that `configure' created (so you can compile the package for
 
 
80
     a different kind of computer), type `make distclean'.  There is
 
 
81
     also a `make maintainer-clean' target, but that is intended mainly
 
 
82
     for the package's developers.  If you use it, you may have to get
 
 
83
     all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
 
 
84
     with the distribution.
 
 
85
 
 
 
86
  7. Often, you can also type `make uninstall' to remove the installed
 
 
87
     files again.  In practice, not all packages have tested that
 
 
88
     uninstallation works correctly, even though it is required by the
 
 
89
     GNU Coding Standards.
 
 
90
 
 
 
91
  8. Some packages, particularly those that use Automake, provide `make
 
 
92
     distcheck', which can by used by developers to test that all other
 
 
93
     targets like `make install' and `make uninstall' work correctly.
 
 
94
     This target is generally not run by end users.
 
 
95
 
 
 
96
Compilers and Options
 
 
97
=====================
 
 
98
 
 
 
99
   Some systems require unusual options for compilation or linking that
 
 
100
the `configure' script does not know about.  Run `./configure --help'
 
 
101
for details on some of the pertinent environment variables.
 
 
102
 
 
 
103
   You can give `configure' initial values for configuration parameters
 
 
104
by setting variables in the command line or in the environment.  Here
 
 
105
is an example:
 
 
106
 
 
 
107
     ./configure CC=c99 CFLAGS=-g LIBS=-lposix
 
 
108
 
 
 
109
   *Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
 
 
110
 
 
 
111
Compiling For Multiple Architectures
 
 
112
====================================
 
 
113
 
 
 
114
   You can compile the package for more than one kind of computer at the
 
 
115
same time, by placing the object files for each architecture in their
 
 
116
own directory.  To do this, you can use GNU `make'.  `cd' to the
 
 
117
directory where you want the object files and executables to go and run
 
 
118
the `configure' script.  `configure' automatically checks for the
 
 
119
source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.  This
 
 
120
is known as a "VPATH" build.
 
 
121
 
 
 
122
   With a non-GNU `make', it is safer to compile the package for one
 
 
123
architecture at a time in the source code directory.  After you have
 
 
124
installed the package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before
 
 
125
reconfiguring for another architecture.
 
 
126
 
 
 
127
   On MacOS X 10.5 and later systems, you can create libraries and
 
 
128
executables that work on multiple system types--known as "fat" or
 
 
129
"universal" binaries--by specifying multiple `-arch' options to the
 
 
130
compiler but only a single `-arch' option to the preprocessor.  Like
 
 
131
this:
 
 
132
 
 
 
133
     ./configure CC="gcc -arch i386 -arch x86_64 -arch ppc -arch ppc64" \
 
 
134
                 CXX="g++ -arch i386 -arch x86_64 -arch ppc -arch ppc64" \
 
 
135
                 CPP="gcc -E" CXXCPP="g++ -E"
 
 
136
 
 
 
137
   This is not guaranteed to produce working output in all cases, you
 
 
138
may have to build one architecture at a time and combine the results
 
 
139
using the `lipo' tool if you have problems.
 
 
140
 
 
 
141
Installation Names
 
 
142
==================
 
 
143
 
 
 
144
   By default, `make install' installs the package's commands under
 
 
145
`/usr/local/bin', include files under `/usr/local/include', etc.  You
 
 
146
can specify an installation prefix other than `/usr/local' by giving
 
 
147
`configure' the option `--prefix=PREFIX', where PREFIX must be an
 
 
148
absolute file name.
 
 
149
 
 
 
150
   You can specify separate installation prefixes for
 
 
151
architecture-specific files and architecture-independent files.  If you
 
 
152
pass the option `--exec-prefix=PREFIX' to `configure', the package uses
 
 
153
PREFIX as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
 
 
154
Documentation and other data files still use the regular prefix.
 
 
155
 
 
 
156
   In addition, if you use an unusual directory layout you can give
 
 
157
options like `--bindir=DIR' to specify different values for particular
 
 
158
kinds of files.  Run `configure --help' for a list of the directories
 
 
159
you can set and what kinds of files go in them.  In general, the
 
 
160
default for these options is expressed in terms of `${prefix}', so that
 
 
161
specifying just `--prefix' will affect all of the other directory
 
 
162
specifications that were not explicitly provided.
 
 
163
 
 
 
164
   The most portable way to affect installation locations is to pass the
 
 
165
correct locations to `configure'; however, many packages provide one or
 
 
166
both of the following shortcuts of passing variable assignments to the
 
 
167
`make install' command line to change installation locations without
 
 
168
having to reconfigure or recompile.
 
 
169
 
 
 
170
   The first method involves providing an override variable for each
 
 
171
affected directory.  For example, `make install
 
 
172
prefix=/alternate/directory' will choose an alternate location for all
 
 
173
directory configuration variables that were expressed in terms of
 
 
174
`${prefix}'.  Any directories that were specified during `configure',
 
 
175
but not in terms of `${prefix}', must each be overridden at install
 
 
176
time for the entire installation to be relocated.  The approach of
 
 
177
makefile variable overrides for each directory variable is required by
 
 
178
the GNU Coding Standards, and ideally causes no recompilation.
 
 
179
However, some platforms have known limitations with the semantics of
 
 
180
shared libraries that end up requiring recompilation when using this
 
 
181
method, particularly noticeable in packages that use GNU Libtool.
 
 
182
 
 
 
183
   The second method involves providing the `DESTDIR' variable.  For
 
 
184
example, `make install DESTDIR=/alternate/directory' will prepend
 
 
185
`/alternate/directory' before all installation names.  The approach of
 
 
186
`DESTDIR' overrides is not required by the GNU Coding Standards, and
 
 
187
does not work on platforms that have drive letters.  On the other hand,
 
 
188
it does better at avoiding recompilation issues, and works well even
 
 
189
when some directory options were not specified in terms of `${prefix}'
 
 
190
at `configure' time.
 
 
191
 
 
 
192
Optional Features
 
 
193
=================
 
 
194
 
 
 
195
   If the package supports it, you can cause programs to be installed
 
 
196
with an extra prefix or suffix on their names by giving `configure' the
 
 
197
option `--program-prefix=PREFIX' or `--program-suffix=SUFFIX'.
 
 
198
 
 
 
199
   Some packages pay attention to `--enable-FEATURE' options to
 
 
200
`configure', where FEATURE indicates an optional part of the package.
 
 
201
They may also pay attention to `--with-PACKAGE' options, where PACKAGE
 
 
202
is something like `gnu-as' or `x' (for the X Window System).  The
 
 
203
`README' should mention any `--enable-' and `--with-' options that the
 
 
204
package recognizes.
 
 
205
 
 
 
206
   For packages that use the X Window System, `configure' can usually
 
 
207
find the X include and library files automatically, but if it doesn't,
 
 
208
you can use the `configure' options `--x-includes=DIR' and
 
 
209
`--x-libraries=DIR' to specify their locations.
 
 
210
 
 
 
211
   Some packages offer the ability to configure how verbose the
 
 
212
execution of `make' will be.  For these packages, running `./configure
 
 
213
--enable-silent-rules' sets the default to minimal output, which can be
 
 
214
overridden with `make V=1'; while running `./configure
 
 
215
--disable-silent-rules' sets the default to verbose, which can be
 
 
216
overridden with `make V=0'.
 
 
217
 
 
 
218
Particular systems
 
 
219
==================
 
 
220
 
 
 
221
   On HP-UX, the default C compiler is not ANSI C compatible.  If GNU
 
 
222
CC is not installed, it is recommended to use the following options in
 
 
223
order to use an ANSI C compiler:
 
 
224
 
 
 
225
     ./configure CC="cc -Ae -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=500"
 
 
226
 
 
 
227
and if that doesn't work, install pre-built binaries of GCC for HP-UX.
 
 
228
 
 
 
229
   On OSF/1 a.k.a. Tru64, some versions of the default C compiler cannot
 
 
230
parse its `<wchar.h>' header file.  The option `-nodtk' can be used as
 
 
231
a workaround.  If GNU CC is not installed, it is therefore recommended
 
 
232
to try
 
 
233
 
 
 
234
     ./configure CC="cc"
 
 
235
 
 
 
236
and if that doesn't work, try
 
 
237
 
 
 
238
     ./configure CC="cc -nodtk"
 
 
239
 
 
 
240
   On Solaris, don't put `/usr/ucb' early in your `PATH'.  This
 
 
241
directory contains several dysfunctional programs; working variants of
 
 
242
these programs are available in `/usr/bin'.  So, if you need `/usr/ucb'
 
 
243
in your `PATH', put it _after_ `/usr/bin'.
 
 
244
 
 
 
245
   On Haiku, software installed for all users goes in `/boot/common',
 
 
246
not `/usr/local'.  It is recommended to use the following options:
 
 
247
 
 
 
248
     ./configure --prefix=/boot/common
 
 
249
 
 
 
250
Specifying the System Type
 
 
251
==========================
 
 
252
 
 
 
253
   There may be some features `configure' cannot figure out
 
 
254
automatically, but needs to determine by the type of machine the package
 
 
255
will run on.  Usually, assuming the package is built to be run on the
 
 
256
_same_ architectures, `configure' can figure that out, but if it prints
 
 
257
a message saying it cannot guess the machine type, give it the
 
 
258
`--build=TYPE' option.  TYPE can either be a short name for the system
 
 
259
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name which has the form:
 
 
260
 
 
 
261
     CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM
 
 
262
 
 
 
263
where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:
 
 
264
 
 
 
265
     OS
 
 
266
     KERNEL-OS
 
 
267
 
 
 
268
   See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field.  If
 
 
269
`config.sub' isn't included in this package, then this package doesn't
 
 
270
need to know the machine type.
 
 
271
 
 
 
272
   If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
 
 
273
use the option `--target=TYPE' to select the type of system they will
 
 
274
produce code for.
 
 
275
 
 
 
276
   If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
 
 
277
platform different from the build platform, you should specify the
 
 
278
"host" platform (i.e., that on which the generated programs will
 
 
279
eventually be run) with `--host=TYPE'.
1
 
280
 
2
                   Installing Heyu on a Unix-like system.
281
Sharing Defaults
3
 
282
================
4
(This file is duplicated as both INSTALL and README.INSTALL, in the
283
 
5
event your case-insensitive file system overwrites INSTALL with the
284
   If you want to set default values for `configure' scripts to share,
6
install script.)
285
you can create a site shell script called `config.site' that gives
7
 
286
default values for variables like `CC', `cache_file', and `prefix'.
8
Heyu requires a reasonable compiler (GCC works well), the 'make' program,
287
`configure' looks for `PREFIX/share/config.site' if it exists, then
9
and the development header (.h) files.  Many OS distributions will either
288
`PREFIX/etc/config.site' if it exists.  Or, you can set the
10
install these by default or provide a visible option to include the
289
`CONFIG_SITE' environment variable to the location of the site script.
11
"development package" during OS installation.  But some of the newer OS's
290
A warning: not all `configure' scripts look for a site script.
12
do not, e.g., with Ubuntu Linux it's necessary to afterward execute the
291
 
13
command 'apt-get install build-essential'. 
292
Defining Variables
14
 
293
==================
15
Note: If you're upgrading from a previous version of Heyu, run 'heyu stop'
294
 
16
under that version before proceeding.
295
   Variables not defined in a site shell script can be set in the
17
 
296
environment passed to `configure'.  However, some packages may run
18
Quickstart:
297
configure again during the build, and the customized values of these
19
    sh ./Configure.sh [option] (As a normal user)
298
variables may be lost.  In order to avoid this problem, you should set
20
    make                       (As a normal user)
299
them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'.  For example:
21
    su                         (Become superuser)
300
 
22
    make install            (As superuser)
301
     ./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc
23
    exit                       (Revert to normal user)
302
 
24
    heyu info               (As a normal user, to test installation)
303
causes the specified `gcc' to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
25
 
304
overridden in the site shell script).
26
(The 'make install' requires that you have write permissions to
305
 
27
/usr/local/bin, man page, and other directories.)
306
Unfortunately, this technique does not work for `CONFIG_SHELL' due to
28
 
307
an Autoconf bug.  Until the bug is fixed you can use this workaround:
29
Ubuntu Linux users should execute 'sudo make install' rather than
308
 
30
the three commands 'su', 'make install', and 'exit'.
309
     CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash /bin/bash ./configure CONFIG_SHELL=/bin/bash
31
 
310
 
32
*** Kindly report any compile errors or warnings to the author.***
311
`configure' Invocation
33
 
312
======================
34
It can take 5-8 seconds to set up the heyu_relay daemon and initialize
313
 
35
the CM11A interface the first time Heyu is run, e.g., with 'heyu info'.
314
   `configure' recognizes the following options to control how it
36
 
315
operates.
37
Running 'heyu help' will display the long list of Heyu commands.
316
 
38
These are further explained in the man page heyu(1).
317
`--help'
39
 
318
`-h'
40
CUSTOMIZING
319
     Print a summary of all of the options to `configure', and exit.
41
-----------
320
 
42
The Configure.sh script creates a Makefile by running 'uname -s' and then
321
`--help=short'
43
passing known good options to Autoconf configure script.  The contents
322
`--help=recursive'
44
of Makefile.in is then expanded to the Makefile.  Changes to the makefile
323
     Print a summary of the options unique to this package's
45
should be made in Configure.sh or Makefile.in.
324
     `configure', and exit.  The `short' variant lists options used
46
 
325
     only in the top level, while the `recursive' variant lists options
47
If Configure.sh can not figure out what your system is, you can try
326
     also present in any nested packages.
48
sh ./Configure.sh generic
327
 
49
    or
328
`--version'
50
sh ./Configure.sh sysv
329
`-V'
51
 
330
     Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
52
If those don't work, we'll have to figure it out by hand. Please contact
331
     script, and exit.
53
the author so your discoveries can be integrated into the next release.
332
 
54
 
333
`--cache-file=FILE'
55
SERIAL PORTS
334
     Enable the cache: use and save the results of the tests in FILE,
56
------------
335
     traditionally `config.cache'.  FILE defaults to `/dev/null' to
57
Many newer computers don't have built-in RS232 serial ports, only USB
336
     disable caching.
58
ports.  For these computers a USB-Serial adapter is required to connect
337
 
59
the CM11A.  Before purchasing a USB-Serial adapter, verify that the driver
338
`--config-cache'
60
for your OS is available, either built-in to the OS, provided with the
339
`-C'
61
adapter on a companion disc, or downloadable from the adapter
340
     Alias for `--cache-file=config.cache'.
62
manufacturer's website.
341
 
63
 
342
`--quiet'
64
If you have a choice, select an adapter with an FTDI chipset over one
343
`--silent'
65
with a Prolific chipset.  One dealer who specifies the chipset
344
`-q'
66
and supported operating systems for each adapter model for sale is
345
     Do not print messages saying which checks are being made.  To
67
ByteRunner (http://ww.byterunner.com).
346
     suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
68
 
347
     messages will still be shown).
69
Drivers for adapters with a Prolific PL2303 chipset can often be found
348
 
70
at http://www.prolific.com.tw/eng/downloads.asp?ID=31
349
`--srcdir=DIR'
71
 
350
     Look for the package's source code in directory DIR.  Usually
72
For Linux, the serial device name for a USB-Serial adapter will normally
351
     `configure' can determine that directory automatically.
73
be /dev/ttyUSBx, where x = 0 for the first adapter plugged into the
352
 
74
USB port and higher numbers for subsequent adapters.
353
`--prefix=DIR'
75
 
354
     Use DIR as the installation prefix.  *note Installation Names::
76
Note: The International 230V version of the CM11 sold in Europe and
355
     for more details, including other options available for fine-tuning
77
elsewhere is now usually provided with a USB cable in addition to the
356
     the installation locations.
78
standard RS232 cable.  Many Linux users have experienced lockups and
357
 
79
other problem with this USB cable (based on a Prolific chipset) which
358
`--no-create'
80
disappeared when they switched to a regular USB-Serial adapter.
359
`-n'
81
 
360
     Run the configure checks, but stop before creating any output
82
OPTIONS
361
     files.
83
------- 
362
 
84
By default, Heyu allocates space for 32 common flags, 32 counters, and
363
`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options.  Run
85
32 user countdown timers.  The number of each of these can be increased
364
`configure --help' for more details.
86
at compile time with switches -flags=NN, -counters=NN, and -timers=NN.
 
 
87
The specified NN must be in the range 1-1024 and will be rounded up to
 
 
88
the nearest multiple of 32, e.g.,
 
 
89
 
 
 
90
   sh ./Configure.sh -flags=64  -timers=75
 
 
91
 
 
 
92
will allocate space for 64 flags and 96 timers, the latter because
 
 
93
the specified 75 is rounded up to 96.  The number of counters will
 
 
94
remain 32.
 
 
95
  
 
 
96
By default, support for the X10 CM17A "Firecracker" device is compiled
 
 
97
into Heyu.  As there is no known version of this device available which
 
 
98
transmits at frequencies other than the 310 MHz used for transceivers
 
 
99
in North America, users outside this region may wish to compile without
 
 
100
CM17A support. Since the CM17A is both powered and actuated by the DTR
 
 
101
and RTS serial lines, support for this device might as well also be
 
 
102
omitted if your serial port hardware does not support these lines.
 
 
103
To do so, run the Configure.sh step mentioned above with the '-nocm17a'
 
 
104
switch, i.e.,
 
 
105
 
 
 
106
    sh ./Configure.sh -nocm17a
 
 
107
 
 
 
108
By default, support for Extended Type 0 (Shutter and Shade) commands
 
 
109
is compiled into Heyu.  As there is only one module known to support
 
 
110
these commands (the 230V, 50Hz Marmitek SW10 Shutter Motor Controller
 
 
111
sold in Europe), this support may be omitted by using Configure.sh with
 
 
112
the '-noext0' switch, i.e., 
 
 
113
 
 
 
114
   sh ./Configure.sh -noext0
 
 
115
 
 
 
116
By default, support for RFXSensors is compiled into Heyu. RFXSensors
 
 
117
require a WGL W800RF32 or RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as well as a RFXSensor
 
 
118
transmitter.  This support may be omitted by including the '-norfxs'
 
 
119
switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
120
 
 
 
121
   sh ./Configure.sh -norfxs
 
 
122
 
 
 
123
By default, support for RFXMeters is compiled into Heyu. RFXMeters
 
 
124
requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as well as the RFXMeter
 
 
125
transmitter.  This support may be omitted by including the '-norfxm' switch
 
 
126
with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
127
 
 
 
128
   sh ./Configure.sh -norfxm
 
 
129
 
 
 
130
By default, support for the Digimax 210 remote thermostat is compiled
 
 
131
into Heyu. The Digimax requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as
 
 
132
well as the Digimax transmitter.  This support may be omitted by
 
 
133
including the '-nodmx' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
134
 
 
 
135
   sh ./Configure.sh -nodmx
 
 
136
 
 
 
137
By default, support for Oregon RF sensors is compilied into Heyu.
 
 
138
Oregon sensor support requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver
 
 
139
as well as a supported model of Oregon sensor.  This support may be
 
 
140
omitted by including the '-noore' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
141
 
 
 
142
   sh ./Configure.sh -noore
 
 
143
 
 
 
144
By default, support for signals received from KaKu and HomeEasy
 
 
145
transmitters is compiled into Heyu.  KaKu/HomeEasy support requires a
 
 
146
433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver.  This support may be omitted
 
 
147
by including the '-nokaku' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
148
 
 
 
149
   sh ./Configure.sh -nokaku
 
 
150
 
 
 
151
By default, support for RFXLAN RF receiver (network version of RFXCOM)
 
 
152
is compiled into Heyu.  This support may be omitted by including the
 
 
153
'-norfxlan' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
154
 
 
 
155
   sh ./Configure.sh -norfxlan
 
 
156
 
 
 
157
 
 
 
158
Notes for Mac OS X:
 
 
159
-------------------
 
 
160
The heyu executable is installed in directory /usr/local/bin, which
 
 
161
is not on the Mac's default PATH.  You will have to add this directory
 
 
162
to your $PATH.  Similarly you may have to add the man page directory
 
 
163
/usr/local/man to your $MANPATH (or the /usr/share/misc/man.conf file
 
 
164
for newer versions of OS X which have deprecated $MANPATH).
 
 
165
 
 
 
166
Newer Macs don't have an actual RS232 serial port, only a USB port,
 
 
167
and a USB/Serial adapter is required.  The manufacturer's adapter
 
 
168
driver will usually add two or more different devices in /dev
 
 
169
(and often with "usbserial" as part of the name).  You'll have
 
 
170
to experiment to see which one works with Heyu by trying the
 
 
171
different names in the TTY directive in the heyu configuration
 
 
172
file.  The device name which also includes "cu" rather than "tty"
 
 
173
has been found to work on the (few) Macs tested thusfar.
 
 
174
 
 
 
175
 
 
 
176
Notes for AT&T SysV r4:
 
 
177
----------------------
 
 
178
The function uname(1) used to determine the system type for
 
 
179
Configure.sh does not distinguish this OS from other sysv systems.
 
 
180
Supply the system type parameter "attsvr4" to Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
181
run 'sh ./Configure.sh attsvr4'.
 
 
182
 
 
 
183
Notes for OpenSolaris:
 
 
184
---------------------
 
 
185
The directories in which the Heyu binary executable and man pages
 
 
186
are installed are set per the OpenSolaris system conventions to:
 
 
187
  BIN = /opt/heyu/bin
 
 
188
  MAN = /opt/heyu/man/man1
 
 
189
  MAN5 = /opt/heyu/man/man5
 
 
190
However for a virgin OS installation, none of these directories
 
 
191
are on the system's PATH/MANPATH and the user is responsible
 
 
192
for adding them to the PATH/MANPATH in order to have full use of
 
 
193
Heyu.
 
 
194
 
 
 
195
The user may alternatively rerun Configure.sh for "OpenSolaris_BSD",
 
 
196
i.e., 'sh ./Configure.sh opensolaris_bsd',
 
 
197
which will set the directories using the BSD convention under
 
 
198
the /usr/local tree, which however may be deleted when OpenSolaris
 
 
199
is upgraded.
 
 
200
 
 
 
201
Some older versions of OpenSolaris, in particular SXCE (Solaris
 
 
202
Express Community Edition), may encounter an error when running
 
 
203
'make install' like "test: argument expected".  If this occurs,
 
 
204
change the first line of file install.sh to read "#!/bin/ksh".
 
 
205
 
365
 
206
 
 
 
207
  
 
 
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
28
    rfxcom.h digimax.h oregon.h
28
    rfxcom.h digimax.h oregon.h
29
dist_man_MANS = heyu.1 x10config.5 x10sched.5 x10scripts.5 x10cm17a.5 x10aux.5 \
29
dist_man_MANS = heyu.1 x10config.5 x10sched.5 x10scripts.5 x10cm17a.5 x10aux.5 \
30
    x10rfxsensors.5 x10rfxmeters.5 x10digimax.5 x10oregon.5 x10kaku.5
30
    x10rfxsensors.5 x10rfxmeters.5 x10digimax.5 x10oregon.5 x10kaku.5
31
dist_doc_DATA = README README2 protocol.txt history.txt heyufaq.txt \
31
dist_doc_DATA = README README1 README2 protocol.txt history.txt heyufaq.txt \
32
    AUTHORS COPYING INSTALL README.cm10a README.webhook release_notes.txt
32
    AUTHORS COPYING INSTALL README.cm10a README.webhook release_notes.txt
33
dist_pkgsysconf_DATA = x10config.sample x10.sched.sample
33
dist_pkgsysconf_DATA = x10config.sample x10.sched.sample
34
EXTRA_DIST = Configure.sh post-install.sh README.INSTALL
34
EXTRA_DIST = Configure.sh post-install.sh
35
 
35
 
36
@MAN1DIR@
36
@MAN1DIR@
37
@MAN5DIR@
37
@MAN5DIR@
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
61
    tty_aux.o relay_aux.o x10aux.o rfxcom.o digimax.o oregon.o
61
    tty_aux.o relay_aux.o x10aux.o rfxcom.o digimax.o oregon.o
62
 
62
 
63
OTHERSRC = README README2 Makefile x10config.sample protocol.txt eeprom.h \
63
OTHERSRC = README README2 Makefile x10config.sample protocol.txt eeprom.h \
64
    x10.sched.sample  heyu.1 x10.h x10config.5 x10cm17a.5 \
64
    README1 x10.sched.sample  heyu.1 x10.h x10config.5 x10cm17a.5 \
65
    history.txt version.h heyufaq.txt x10sched.5 process.h sun.h \
65
    history.txt version.h heyufaq.txt x10sched.5 process.h sun.h \
66
    x10scripts.5 Configure.sh Makefile.in post-install.sh AUTHORS COPYING INSTALL \
66
    x10scripts.5 Configure.sh Makefile.in post-install.sh AUTHORS COPYING INSTALL \
67
        README.cm10a x10aux.5 x10state.h rfxcom.h digimax.h oregon.h x10rfxsensors.5\
67
        README.cm10a x10aux.5 x10state.h rfxcom.h digimax.h oregon.h x10rfxsensors.5\
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
1
                     HEYU (version 1) Program overview
1
 
2
 
2
                   Installing Heyu on a Unix-like system.
3
This program operates an X10 module via a CM11A computer interface. It is
3
 
4
based on the program X10 by Larry Cambell as modified by Paul Fox. All but a
4
Heyu requires a reasonable compiler (GCC works well), the 'make' program,
5
few functions have been changed enough that they no longer interwork with
5
and the development header (.h) files.  Many OS distributions will either
6
the original. I think this justifies issuing the program as 'heyu' instead
6
install these by default or provide a visible option to include the
7
of 'x10'.
7
"development package" during OS installation.  But some of the newer OS's
8
 
8
do not, e.g., with Ubuntu Linux it's necessary to afterward execute the
9
The program name comes from the old joke about having a 3rd person in the
9
command 'apt-get install build-essential'. 
10
house. Ida No was the one frequently blamed when things went wrong. In my
10
 
11
house it was the frequently heard yells of "Heyu! Turn off the lights!"
11
Note: If you're upgrading from a previous version of Heyu, run 'heyu stop'
12
A poor joke, but I like it.
12
under that version before proceeding.
13
 
13
 
14
The program is strictly command line driven, and works well with crontab.
14
Quickstart:
15
Crontab can be used to schedule events. You can also upload timers and
15
    sh ./Configure.sh [option] (As a normal user)
16
macros to the CM11's memory.
16
    make                       (As a normal user)
17
 
17
    su                         (Become superuser)
18
The program comes complete with source code, sample config files, MAN pages
18
    make install            (As superuser)
19
an executable binary. The program has options to allow you to:
19
    exit                       (Revert to normal user)
20
 
20
    heyu info               (As a normal user, to test installation)
21
   * Get the date and time from the interface
21
 
22
   * Get information about current settings and module states
22
(The 'make install' requires that you have write permissions to
23
   * Turn an X10 module on or off
23
/usr/local/bin, man page, and other directories.)
24
   * Dim or brighten an X10 module
24
 
25
   * Monitor all data sent to or from the CM11A
25
Ubuntu Linux users should execute 'sudo make install' rather than
26
   * Get the status of intelligent X10 modules (rr501 for instance)
26
the three commands 'su', 'make install', and 'exit'.
27
   * Set the X10 clock from the computer's clock (time and date)
27
 
28
   * Zero out the macro and event memory of the X10
28
*** Kindly report any compile errors or warnings to the author.***
29
   * Upload macros and timers
29
 
30
   * preset the dim level of advanced two way devices
30
It can take 5-8 seconds to set up the heyu_relay daemon and initialize
31
 
31
the CM11A interface the first time Heyu is run, e.g., with 'heyu info'.
32
As of version 1.27, Heyu has the ability to send a schedule of events to the
32
 
33
CM11A. This enables timers and macros.
33
Running 'heyu help' will display the long list of Heyu commands.
34
 
34
These are further explained in the man page heyu(1).
35
The people at X10 have informed me that there is no way to download (to the
35
 
36
computer) the events stored in the CM11A. That being the case, I wrote
36
CUSTOMIZING
37
programs that will load the events and macros from local data files. This
37
-----------
38
will erase whatever has been stored there, but I guess that's the way it has
38
The Configure.sh script creates a Makefile by running 'uname -s' and then
39
to be.
39
passing known good options to Autoconf configure script.  The contents
40
 
40
of Makefile.in is then expanded to the Makefile.  Changes to the makefile
41
This should compile on any Linux system. It should also compile on any other
41
should be made in Configure.sh or Makefile.in.
42
BSDish or SYSV system. Just edit the #define in the make file. Make install
42
 
43
will try to install the man page and the program. The makefile has defines
43
If Configure.sh can not figure out what your system is, you can try
44
for these locations.
44
sh ./Configure.sh generic
45
 
45
    or
46
See the original README in Larry Campbell's program for some nice info on
46
sh ./Configure.sh sysv
47
the cp290 and the history of the program. See the original for some really
47
 
48
niffty uses using scheduling and macros.
48
If those don't work, we'll have to figure it out by hand. Please contact
49
 
49
the author so your discoveries can be integrated into the next release.
50
There are two demo programs included with heyu, monit and x10biff.
50
 
51
 
51
SERIAL PORTS
52
   * The monit program will turn off your monitor based on idle time. It's
52
------------
53
     the ultimate screen saver.
53
Many newer computers don't have built-in RS232 serial ports, only USB
54
   * The x10biff program will flash a light to let you know that you have
54
ports.  For these computers a USB-Serial adapter is required to connect
55
     E-mail.
55
the CM11A.  Before purchasing a USB-Serial adapter, verify that the driver
56
 
56
for your OS is available, either built-in to the OS, provided with the
57
Daniel B. Suthers, CCP, CSP
57
adapter on a companion disc, or downloadable from the adapter
58
12-31-1996
58
manufacturer's website.
59
Updated 12-12-1999
59
 
60
E-mail: dbs@tanj.com
60
If you have a choice, select an adapter with an FTDI chipset over one
61
uucp: pacbell!daver!dansst!dbs
61
with a Prolific chipset.  One dealer who specifies the chipset
 
 
62
and supported operating systems for each adapter model for sale is
 
 
63
ByteRunner (http://ww.byterunner.com).
 
 
64
 
 
 
65
Drivers for adapters with a Prolific PL2303 chipset can often be found
 
 
66
at http://www.prolific.com.tw/eng/downloads.asp?ID=31
 
 
67
 
 
 
68
For Linux, the serial device name for a USB-Serial adapter will normally
 
 
69
be /dev/ttyUSBx, where x = 0 for the first adapter plugged into the
 
 
70
USB port and higher numbers for subsequent adapters.
 
 
71
 
 
 
72
Note: The International 230V version of the CM11 sold in Europe and
 
 
73
elsewhere is now usually provided with a USB cable in addition to the
 
 
74
standard RS232 cable.  Many Linux users have experienced lockups and
 
 
75
other problem with this USB cable (based on a Prolific chipset) which
 
 
76
disappeared when they switched to a regular USB-Serial adapter.
 
 
77
 
 
 
78
OPTIONS
 
 
79
------- 
 
 
80
By default, Heyu allocates space for 32 common flags, 32 counters, and
 
 
81
32 user countdown timers.  The number of each of these can be increased
 
 
82
at compile time with switches -flags=NN, -counters=NN, and -timers=NN.
 
 
83
The specified NN must be in the range 1-1024 and will be rounded up to
 
 
84
the nearest multiple of 32, e.g.,
 
 
85
 
 
 
86
   sh ./Configure.sh -flags=64  -timers=75
 
 
87
 
 
 
88
will allocate space for 64 flags and 96 timers, the latter because
 
 
89
the specified 75 is rounded up to 96.  The number of counters will
 
 
90
remain 32.
 
 
91
  
 
 
92
By default, support for the X10 CM17A "Firecracker" device is compiled
 
 
93
into Heyu.  As there is no known version of this device available which
 
 
94
transmits at frequencies other than the 310 MHz used for transceivers
 
 
95
in North America, users outside this region may wish to compile without
 
 
96
CM17A support. Since the CM17A is both powered and actuated by the DTR
 
 
97
and RTS serial lines, support for this device might as well also be
 
 
98
omitted if your serial port hardware does not support these lines.
 
 
99
To do so, run the Configure.sh step mentioned above with the '-nocm17a'
 
 
100
switch, i.e.,
 
 
101
 
 
 
102
    sh ./Configure.sh -nocm17a
 
 
103
 
 
 
104
By default, support for Extended Type 0 (Shutter and Shade) commands
 
 
105
is compiled into Heyu.  As there is only one module known to support
 
 
106
these commands (the 230V, 50Hz Marmitek SW10 Shutter Motor Controller
 
 
107
sold in Europe), this support may be omitted by using Configure.sh with
 
 
108
the '-noext0' switch, i.e., 
 
 
109
 
 
 
110
   sh ./Configure.sh -noext0
 
 
111
 
 
 
112
By default, support for RFXSensors is compiled into Heyu. RFXSensors
 
 
113
require a WGL W800RF32 or RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as well as a RFXSensor
 
 
114
transmitter.  This support may be omitted by including the '-norfxs'
 
 
115
switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
116
 
 
 
117
   sh ./Configure.sh -norfxs
 
 
118
 
 
 
119
By default, support for RFXMeters is compiled into Heyu. RFXMeters
 
 
120
requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as well as the RFXMeter
 
 
121
transmitter.  This support may be omitted by including the '-norfxm' switch
 
 
122
with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
123
 
 
 
124
   sh ./Configure.sh -norfxm
 
 
125
 
 
 
126
By default, support for the Digimax 210 remote thermostat is compiled
 
 
127
into Heyu. The Digimax requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver as
 
 
128
well as the Digimax transmitter.  This support may be omitted by
 
 
129
including the '-nodmx' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
130
 
 
 
131
   sh ./Configure.sh -nodmx
 
 
132
 
 
 
133
By default, support for Oregon RF sensors is compilied into Heyu.
 
 
134
Oregon sensor support requires a 433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver
 
 
135
as well as a supported model of Oregon sensor.  This support may be
 
 
136
omitted by including the '-noore' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
137
 
 
 
138
   sh ./Configure.sh -noore
 
 
139
 
 
 
140
By default, support for signals received from KaKu and HomeEasy
 
 
141
transmitters is compiled into Heyu.  KaKu/HomeEasy support requires a
 
 
142
433.92 MHz RFXCOM X10 RF receiver.  This support may be omitted
 
 
143
by including the '-nokaku' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
144
 
 
 
145
   sh ./Configure.sh -nokaku
 
 
146
 
 
 
147
By default, support for RFXLAN RF receiver (network version of RFXCOM)
 
 
148
is compiled into Heyu.  This support may be omitted by including the
 
 
149
'-norfxlan' switch with Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
150
 
 
 
151
   sh ./Configur.sh -norfxlan
 
 
152
 
 
 
153
 
 
 
154
Notes for Mac OS X:
 
 
155
-------------------
 
 
156
The heyu executable is installed in directory /usr/local/bin, which
 
 
157
is not on the Mac's default PATH.  You will have to add this directory
 
 
158
to your $PATH.  Similarly you may have to add the man page directory
 
 
159
/usr/local/man to your $MANPATH (or the /usr/share/misc/man.conf file
 
 
160
for newer versions of OS X which have deprecated $MANPATH).
 
 
161
 
 
 
162
Newer Macs don't have an actual RS232 serial port, only a USB port,
 
 
163
and a USB/Serial adapter is required.  The manufacturer's adapter
 
 
164
driver will usually add two or more different devices in /dev
 
 
165
(and often with "usbserial" as part of the name).  You'll have
 
 
166
to experiment to see which one works with Heyu by trying the
 
 
167
different names in the TTY directive in the heyu configuration
 
 
168
file.  The device name which also includes "cu" rather than "tty"
 
 
169
has been found to work on the (few) Macs tested thusfar.
 
 
170
 
 
 
171
 
 
 
172
Notes for AT&T SysV r4:
 
 
173
----------------------
 
 
174
The function uname(1) used to determine the system type for
 
 
175
Configure.sh does not distinguish this OS from other sysv systems.
 
 
176
Supply the system type parameter "attsvr4" to Configure.sh, i.e.,
 
 
177
run 'sh ./Configure.sh attsvr4'.
 
 
178
 
 
 
179
Notes for OpenSolaris:
 
 
180
---------------------
 
 
181
The directories in which the Heyu binary executable and man pages
 
 
182
are installed are set per the OpenSolaris system conventions to:
 
 
183
  BIN = /opt/heyu/bin
 
 
184
  MAN = /opt/heyu/man/man1
 
 
185
  MAN5 = /opt/heyu/man/man5
 
 
186
However for a virgin OS installation, none of these directories
 
 
187
are on the system's PATH/MANPATH and the user is responsible
 
 
188
for adding them to the PATH/MANPATH in order to have full use of
 
 
189
Heyu.
 
 
190
 
 
 
191
The user may alternatively rerun Configure.sh for "OpenSolaris_BSD",
 
 
192
i.e., 'sh ./Configure.sh opensolaris_bsd',
 
 
193
which will set the directories using the BSD convention under
 
 
194
the /usr/local tree, which however may be deleted when OpenSolaris
 
 
195
is upgraded.
 
 
196
 
 
 
197
Some older versions of OpenSolaris, in particular SXCE (Solaris
 
 
198
Express Community Edition), may encounter an error when running
 
 
199
'make install' like "test: argument expected".  If this occurs,
 
 
200
change the first line of file install.sh to read "#!/bin/ksh".
 
 
201
 
 
 
202
 
 
 
203
  
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
 
 
1
                     HEYU (version 1) Program overview
 
 
2
 
 
 
3
This program operates an X10 module via a CM11A computer interface. It is
 
 
4
based on the program X10 by Larry Cambell as modified by Paul Fox. All but a
 
 
5
few functions have been changed enough that they no longer interwork with
 
 
6
the original. I think this justifies issuing the program as 'heyu' instead
 
 
7
of 'x10'.
 
 
8
 
 
 
9
The program name comes from the old joke about having a 3rd person in the
 
 
10
house. Ida No was the one frequently blamed when things went wrong. In my
 
 
11
house it was the frequently heard yells of "Heyu! Turn off the lights!"
 
 
12
A poor joke, but I like it.
 
 
13
 
 
 
14
The program is strictly command line driven, and works well with crontab.
 
 
15
Crontab can be used to schedule events. You can also upload timers and
 
 
16
macros to the CM11's memory.
 
 
17
 
 
 
18
The program comes complete with source code, sample config files, MAN pages
 
 
19
an executable binary. The program has options to allow you to:
 
 
20
 
 
 
21
   * Get the date and time from the interface
 
 
22
   * Get information about current settings and module states
 
 
23
   * Turn an X10 module on or off
 
 
24
   * Dim or brighten an X10 module
 
 
25
   * Monitor all data sent to or from the CM11A
 
 
26
   * Get the status of intelligent X10 modules (rr501 for instance)
 
 
27
   * Set the X10 clock from the computer's clock (time and date)
 
 
28
   * Zero out the macro and event memory of the X10
 
 
29
   * Upload macros and timers
 
 
30
   * preset the dim level of advanced two way devices
 
 
31
 
 
 
32
As of version 1.27, Heyu has the ability to send a schedule of events to the
 
 
33
CM11A. This enables timers and macros.
 
 
34
 
 
 
35
The people at X10 have informed me that there is no way to download (to the
 
 
36
computer) the events stored in the CM11A. That being the case, I wrote
 
 
37
programs that will load the events and macros from local data files. This
 
 
38
will erase whatever has been stored there, but I guess that's the way it has
 
 
39
to be.
 
 
40
 
 
 
41
This should compile on any Linux system. It should also compile on any other
 
 
42
BSDish or SYSV system. Just edit the #define in the make file. Make install
 
 
43
will try to install the man page and the program. The makefile has defines
 
 
44
for these locations.
 
 
45
 
 
 
46
See the original README in Larry Campbell's program for some nice info on
 
 
47
the cp290 and the history of the program. See the original for some really
 
 
48
niffty uses using scheduling and macros.
 
 
49
 
 
 
50
There are two demo programs included with heyu, monit and x10biff.
 
 
51
 
 
 
52
   * The monit program will turn off your monitor based on idle time. It's
 
 
53
     the ultimate screen saver.
 
 
54
   * The x10biff program will flash a light to let you know that you have
 
 
55
     E-mail.
 
 
56
 
 
 
57
Daniel B. Suthers, CCP, CSP
 
 
58
12-31-1996
 
 
59
Updated 12-12-1999
 
 
60
E-mail: dbs@tanj.com
 
 
61
uucp: pacbell!daver!dansst!dbs
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
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transmits at an RF frequency other than the 310 MHz used for X10
24
transmits at an RF frequency other than the 310 MHz used for X10
25
transceivers in North America.  Therefore an option is provided to
25
transceivers in North America.  Therefore an option is provided to
26
compile Heyu without CM17A support for users outside North America or
26
compile Heyu without CM17A support for users outside North America or
27
simply those who have no interest in this device. (See the file "INSTALL"
27
simply those who have no interest in this device. (See the file "README"
28
included in the Heyu distribution directory.)
28
included in the Heyu distribution directory.)
29
 
29
 
30
.SH CM17A COMMANDS
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.SH CM17A COMMANDS
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19
 
20
.SH COMPILER OPTION
20
.SH COMPILER OPTION
21
Support for DigiMax is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
21
Support for DigiMax is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
22
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file INSTALL
22
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file README
23
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
23
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
24
 
24
 
25
.SH CONFIGURATION
25
.SH CONFIGURATION
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
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.SH COMPILER OPTION
19
.SH COMPILER OPTION
20
Support for KaKu/HomeEasy remotes is compiled into Heyu by default.
20
Support for KaKu/HomeEasy remotes is compiled into Heyu by default.
21
A compiler option can be used to omit this support.  See the file
21
A compiler option can be used to omit this support.  See the file
22
INSTALL included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
22
README included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
23
 
23
 
24
.SH CONFIGURATION
24
.SH CONFIGURATION
25
It is assumed that a working installation of Heyu version 2.8 or
25
It is assumed that a working installation of Heyu version 2.8 or
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
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24
 
25
.SH COMPILER OPTION
25
.SH COMPILER OPTION
26
Support for Oregon sensors is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
26
Support for Oregon sensors is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
27
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file INSTALL
27
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file README
28
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
28
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
29
 
29
 
30
.SH CONFIGURATION
30
.SH CONFIGURATION
aebb30af433d47e9579f374017d68720ebbd60c47f1a1a9fa3bbf28297715020e334204971538420
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20
 
21
.SH COMPILER OPTION
21
.SH COMPILER OPTION
22
Support for RFXMeters is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
22
Support for RFXMeters is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
23
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file INSTALL
23
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file README
24
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
24
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
25
 
25
 
26
.SH HEYU CONFIGURATION
26
.SH HEYU CONFIGURATION
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20
 
21
.SH COMPILER OPTION
21
.SH COMPILER OPTION
22
Support for RFXSensors is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
22
Support for RFXSensors is compiled into Heyu by default.  A compiler
23
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file INSTALL
23
option can be used to omit this support.  See the file README
24
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
24
included in the Heyu distribution source directory for details.
25
 
25
 
26
.SH CONFIGURATION
26
.SH CONFIGURATION